Category Archives: Data Security

Upon Further Review: Saving files to the Cloud

Many years ago when I was interviewing for my first IT position, my boss said during the interview.  That he wanted to figure out a way to save files to a webserver, charge people to access the files and charge run time to use the applications on the webserver.   His vision then is happening now.  You can save a file offsite to a webserver or a webserver farm and access that file from any PC/MAC/Laptop in the world.  This webserver or webservers’ service is called Cloud Computing or the Cloud.  It is a global service which means that our files are now global.  You have gone local to global in a blink of an eye.  John Carroll of Tres Coaching Service, I hope you are smiling about the previous sentence.  But now the question is when you save a file to the Cloud, are you giving up your intellectual rights to that file? Some people say yes and some people say no.   You decide.

Most people do not read the terms of service when signing up with Google, Dropbox, Windows Live or any offsite file saving company.  As most attorneys say always read the terms of service including the fine print before you sign or agree to it.

Apple MobileMe (Current Subscribers only, No New subscribers because of iCloud )

License from You

Except for material we may license to you, Apple does not claim ownership of the materials and/or Content you submit or make available on the Service. However, by submitting or posting such Content on areas of the Service that are accessible by the public, you grant Apple a worldwide, royalty-free, non-exclusive license to use, distribute, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, publicly perform and publicly display such Content on the Service solely for the purpose for which such Content was submitted or made available. Said license will terminate within a commercially reasonable time after you or Apple remove such Content from the public area. By submitting or posting such Content on areas of the Service that are accessible by the public, you are representing that you are the owner of such material and/or have authorization to distribute it.

Amazon Web Services as of May 23,2011

8. Proprietary Rights

8.1 Your Content. As between you and us, you or your licensors own all right, title, and interest in and to Your Content. Except as provided in this Section 8, we obtain no rights under this Agreement from you or your licensors to Your Content, including any related intellectual property rights. You consent to our use of Your Content to provide the Service Offerings to you and any End Users. We may disclose Your Content to provide the Service Offerings to you or any End Users or to comply with any request of a governmental or regulatory body (including subpoenas or court orders).

Dropbox Terms of Service as 07/06/11

Your Stuff & Your Privacy

By using our Services you provide us with information, files, and folders that you submit to Dropbox (together, “your stuff”). You retain full ownership to your stuff. We don’t claim any ownership to any of it. These Terms do not grant us any rights to your stuff or intellectual property except for the limited rights that are needed to run the Services, as explained below.

We may need your permission to do things you ask us to do with your stuff, for example, hosting your files, or sharing them at your direction. This includes product features visible to you, for example, image thumbnails or document previews. It also includes design choices we make to technically administer our Services, for example, how we redundantly backup data to keep it safe. You give us the permissions we need to do those things solely to provide the Services. This permission also extends to trusted third parties we work with to provide the Services, for example Amazon, which provides our storage space (again, only to provide the Services).

To be clear, aside from the rare exceptions we identify in our Privacy Policy, no matter how the Services change, we won’t share your content with others, including law enforcement, for any purpose unless you direct us to. How we collect and use your information generally is also explained in our Privacy Policy.

You are solely responsible for your conduct, the content of your files and folders, and your communications with others while using the Services. For example, it’s your responsibility to ensure that you have the rights or permission needed to comply with these Terms.

We may choose to review public content for compliance with our community guidelines, but you acknowledge that Dropbox has no obligation to monitor any information on the Services. We are not responsible for the accuracy, completeness, appropriateness, or legality of files, user posts, or any other information you may be able to access using the Services.

Google Storage

11. Content license from you

11.1 You retain copyright and any other rights you already hold in Content which you submit, post or display on or through, the Services. By submitting, posting or displaying the content you give Google a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free, and non-exclusive license to reproduce, adapt, modify, translate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute any Content which you submit, post or display on or through, the Services. This license is for the sole purpose of enabling Google to display, distribute and promote the Services and may be revoked for certain Services as defined in the Additional Terms of those Services.

11.2 You agree that this license includes a right for Google to make such Content available to other companies, organizations or individuals with whom Google has relationships for the provision of syndicated services, and to use such Content in connection with the provision of those services.

11.3 You understand that Google, in performing the required technical steps to provide the Services to our users, may (a) transmit or distribute your Content over various public networks and in various media; and (b) make such changes to your Content as are necessary to conform and adapt that Content to the technical requirements of connecting networks, devices, services or media. You agree that this license shall permit Google to take these actions.

11.4 You confirm and warrant to Google that you have all the rights, power and authority necessary to grant the above license.

Microsoft Live including SkyDrive as August 31, 2010

5. Your Content

Except for material that we license to you, we don’t claim ownership of the content you provide on the service. Your content remains your content. We also don’t control, verify, or endorse the content that you and others make available on the service.

You control who may access your content. If you share content in public areas of the service or in shared areas available to others you’ve chosen, then you agree that anyone you’ve shared content with may use that content. When you give others access to your content on the service, you grant them free, nonexclusive permission to use, reproduce, distribute, display, transmit, and communicate to the public the content solely in connection with the service and other products and services made available by Microsoft. If you don’t want others to have those rights, don’t use the service to share your content.

You understand that Microsoft may need, and you hereby grant Microsoft the right, to use, modify, adapt, reproduce, distribute, and display content posted on the service solely to the extent necessary to provide the service.

Please respect the rights of artists, inventors, and creators. Content may be protected by copyright. People appearing in content may have a right to control the use of their image. If you share content on the service in a way that infringes others’ copyrights, other intellectual property rights, or privacy rights, you’re breaching this contract. You represent and warrant that you have all the rights necessary for you to grant the rights in this section and the use of the content doesn’t violate any law. We won’t pay you for your content. We may refuse to publish your content for any or no reason. We may remove your content from the service at any time if you breach this contract or if we cancel or suspend the service.

You’re responsible for backing up the data that you store on the service. If your service is suspended or canceled, we may permanently delete your data from our servers. We have no obligation to return data to you after the service is suspended or canceled. If data is stored with an expiration date, we may also delete the data as of that date. Data that is deleted may be irretrievable.

Until next time

Ruben Cisneros

ruben@dfwon-site.com

http://www.dfwon-site.com

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Upon Further Review: How are you insuring your data

Hello,

Happy Fourth of July.

Sometimes fireworks can cause minor damage to your home or totally destroy a home which could mean losing your PC with all your family pictures.  So my question to those of you who read this is, how do you insure your PC/Laptop data?  Do you back up to an external hard drive on a regular basis or do you use some type of offsite backup or do you do both?

I do both. I have about 180 Gigabytes of data (which includes music, pictures, spreadsheets, word documents, etc) that I back up to a second internal hard drive on a nightly basis and I also backup to an offsite server as well.

Why do both?  If I have to recover a large file (i.e. an Outlook PST file of 1 gigabyte file), the restoration of that file is quicker from my second internal hard drive than from an offsite restoration.  The offsite backup is protection from total loss (i.e. a house fire, or your house being hit by lighting and frying your PC/Laptop).

There are several advantages to offsite backup.  Here are a few:  if your PC and external hard drive are destroyed by a house fire or lightening hitting the house, your data is safe because it is stored offsite; you do not have to remember to attach the external hard drive  to your PC or laptop; and your external hard drive can go bad.

Last week, a client’s external hard drive crashed.  Fortunately for my client I was able to recover the data.  If they had used an offsite backup system, my client could have save some money by logging into their account and downloading the file.  Now many of my clients only use offsite backup to insure their data.  If and when their hard drive failed, they have  no problem restoring their data from their offsite backup location.  If you decided to start backing up your data offsite, please make sure the company you use encrypts your data.

One more thing, there is a new Rootkit out there.  A Rootkit is a trojan.  This Trojan requires a complete wipe and rebuild of your computer if you get it.  The Trojan hides the boot sector (Ouch). (The boot sector comes up when you turn on your computer.  It tells the system where to go to start the Windows operating system).  The Rootkit is called “Popureb”.  Please check this website for further information about this nasty critter: http://www.wservernews.com/go/1309601826046

Ruben